Refinancing their college loans too frequently can be harm your own borrowing

  • Extending living of financing: Refinancing can extend your repayment period, which will leave you paying more when it’s all said and done. It may make sense for you if you need to lower your monthly payment, but keep in mind that you’ll pay significantly more in interest charges over the long run. Make sure you understand your new repayment terms and how they will affect your overall student loan debt.
  • Boosting your interest rate: It’s common to choose to refinance in order to reduce your interest rate. However, lenders don’t always offer a lower interest rate. You want to choose a loan that gives you the lowest interest rate possible. Aim for interest rates below 10%.
  • Origination costs: Origination fees cover the lender’s cost for processing the new loan, including underwriting, running credit, and verifying and processing the borrower’s documents. Some private lenders charge excessive origination fees, while others choose to offer loans without any origination fees. Do your research and compare fees so you aren’t adding to your loan balance straight out of the gate when you don’t necessarily have to.
  • Prepayment costs: Prepayment fees are illegal for student loans. All student loan lenders are required to allow penalty-free prepayment. Even though there are regulations in place, there are still lenders out there that are misleading and dishonest. If a lender claims there will be a charge for paying off your student loans early, move on to another lender.
  • App charge: Most student loan lenders don’t charge application fees, but if you find a lender that does, know that this will be an up-front, non-refundable fee just to submit your loan application. Continue reading